Do I Need Bass Traps? The Truth Revealed

A Picture Of A Bass Clef Trapped Behing Bars

Do I need bass traps is another question that gets thrown around a lot.

I’ve heard many people say,

“Yes, they are an essential part in a studio and vital when treating the acoustics of your room”

And I’ve also heard people say,

“Bass traps are a waste of space!”

So, what’s the truth? Are bass traps worth using? Do they make any difference?

And the big question:

Do you need bass traps in your home studio?

Let’s find out...

Do I need bass traps is another question that gets thrown around a lot.

I’ve heard many people say,

“Yes, they are an essential part in a studio and vital when treating the acoustics of your room”

And I’ve also heard people say,

“Bass traps are a waste of space!”

So, what’s the truth? Are bass traps worth using? Do they make any difference?

And the big question:

Do you need bass traps in your home studio?

Let’s find out...

A Picture Of A Bass Clef Trapped Behing Bars

More...

Bass Traps Are NOT The Same As Acoustic Panels.

Here is something you can try:

Play a song with a lot of bass and walk around your room especially near the corners, you will be able to hear the bass get louder and softer in an untreated room.

Stand in the corners of your room and feel the bass increase:

A Picture Showing Bass Frequencies Hanging In The Corners Of The Room

This shows you where you are going to need bass traps the most.

Typically you will want to fill every corner of your room and every point where your walls touch the ceiling or floor.

An Image Showing You Where To Put Bass Traps In Your Studio

But being a home studio and having limited space, this isn’t always possible or practical.

The reason you want to cover the corners of your room is because bass frequencies are long, thick and drawn out...

...And love to hang in the corners.

As bass frequencies are much longer and thicker, they require a much more dense material to absorb the sound waves.

That’s why you can’t just put thin acoustic panels in the corners and call it a day.

How Many Do I Need?

Contrary to acoustic panels.

When using bass traps more is better!

More Is Better Graph

This is especially the case if you have a smaller studio.

You will want to cover all four corners of your room from top to bottom at the very least and if you can...

...Put some between the walls and ceiling.

I wouldn't recommend putting any on the floor unless you have a big studio and you really need them.​

TIP: To get a nice look and tight fit, use a foam square like this:​

Bass Trap In A Corner With A Cube In The Middle

As I said before, the more bass trapping you have, the more beneficial it will be for your room.

Bass traps are arguably one of the best upgrades for a room where mixing happens.

What kind Do I Need?

You have two choices:

1. Foam bass traps

Foam Bass Traps

Foam bass traps can only do so much because they are not dense enough, so you will always be fighting against the frequencies that the foam can’t absorb.

But:

They are readily available everywhere and are usually cheaper.

2. Rigid fiberglass

Rigid Fiberglass Bass Trap

Rigid fiberglass is much thicker and more dense which helps to tame the very low bass frequencies considerably.

It’s well worth spending a few extra pennies as they last forever, look great and wi​ll help out so much more in the long run.

The only down sides are they are more expensive and take up more space than foam traps.

There are definitely more reasons to go with fiberglass if you care about your mixing and have the extra money to spend.

Look:

If you buy foam bass traps now.

I’m sure down the line you will change them out for rigid fiberglass panels.

So why not just do it now and save yourself the time, trouble and money in the future.

And get on with what really matters…MUSIC!

Oh and I think we can all agree:

Rigid fiberglass panels look so much sexier!

Here is a pros and cons list for both foam and rigid bass traps:​

Foam Bass Traps

The Pros List

  • check
    Cheaper
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    Small and lightweight
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    Easier to place on the walls

The Cons List

  • Less dense
  • ​Can't tame the very low frequencies​​​​
  • ​Can be squashed or dented easily
  • ​Doesn't look as good
  • ​Not as many colors available

Foam bass traps are ideal if you are on a budget or have a really small studio. They are light and simple to hang but do tend to fall down after a while since glue doesn't stick to the foam very well.

Rigid Fiberglass

The Pros List

  • check
    ​Much thicker and more dense
  • check
    ​Way better for the low frequencies
  • check
    ​Lasts forever
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    ​Looks really cool
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    ​Can be any color
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    ​Can have a custom pattern or design on them

The Cons List

  • ​More expensive
  • Takes up more room

If you want the best studio you can get rigid fiberglass is the way to go. They have a lot more benefits than foam, but it all depends how much cash you have to splash.

Let’s Wrap It Up

Bass traps are probably one of the most important aspects in a studio.

But certainly not the only important thing.

Having just bass traps will help.

But, there are other vital elements of a home studio that should not be avoided.

Such as:

What you go for is up to you, as it is your studio and you make the decisions.

I am only here to advise you.

To Recap:

  1. Choose either foam or rigid fiberglass bass traps
  2. Second, put them in all four corners of your room (or as many as you can).
  3. Third, focus on the other corners where the low end is still a problem.

Just remember, the smaller the studio the more bass trapping you will need and the denser your bass traps will have to be.


What Are Your Thoughts On Bass Traps?

Do you have bass traps in your studio?

If not are you going to get some?

Either way, let me know by leaving a comment below right now.​

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